Saturday, September 18, 2010

COPTIC BOOK BINDING



I am learning how to bind a book using the coptic technique. My friend Elizabeth will be teaching a workshop at uac and we are trying some of the processes together beforehand. It was a bit awkward for me at first, but soon I got the hang of the sewing and enjoyed the meditative quality of this method. Covers will be attached next.....

Friday, September 10, 2010

WORK IN PROGRESS PART TWO



Using the glue base was a good idea, they did keep standing and it made it easier to drop them into the bottle... more to come.
Buried on Hart Island November 1898
Robert Kirschner age 35
Cause of death: Illumination Gas at 206 Fifth Street, NYC, NY
Robert Kirschner arrived from Saxony, Germany on August 5, 1890 on the Eider. He came with his wife Laura and baby daughter, Helene. He killed himself on Nov. 22, 1898.

Correction: for the record, this is not an exact representation of how the prisoners work or bury the dead on Hart Island. After an extensive talk with Melinda Hunt, I feel I must add this information and admit to my artistic license in this depiction. No disrespect was meant in the interpretation.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

HE HAS MENTAL HABITS


He Has Mental Habits
multiple gocco prints on wall paper in various sizes


Here is how it went, Mary told me about Frank Gelett Burgess, so I looked at a book he created using old wall paper, it inspired me to do some kind of print. I told my friends I was looking for old wall paper. They gave me some (actually a lot, thank you, Elizabeth and Robrt).* Elizabeth's paper had a Frank Lloyd Wright pattern with a signature. That made me think of this crazy set of handwriting analysis books that I have, which then led me to the chapter on forgeries from which the excerpt comes. After that I found a book about Frank Lloyd Wright in Japan and loved the form of the title characters.

Burgess wrote another story about a man who goes from rags to riches, (see previous post) which tells how a pauper was instructed to fill out every ad in the two-penny paper, after which he would in turn receive more free samples than he could ever possibly use. He then sold his free items to make his fortune.

Somehow this all ties together (in my mind) the cleverness which all parties represented in this multiple gocco print possess.

This all is topped off with the a seal of approval. More close ups on flickr.

*There was an earlier attempt at printing this idea using the YuDu machine with Jill. It was our first attempt and it was not successful. But we have not given up. Watch for more posts about the YuDu in the future.

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

WORK IN PROGRESS PART ONE



Hart Island still haunts me. Today I am planning my next project about it. I found these HO scale figures in Denver. They have a bit of a problem standing, so I am experimenting with creating glue bases (that are supposed to dry clear). I am hoping I will be able to then place them in bottles to create some vignettes.

Correction: for the record, this is not an exact representation of how the prisoners work or bury the dead on Hart Island. After an extensive talk with Melinda Hunt, I feel I must add this information and admit to my artistic license in this depiction. No disrespect was meant in the interpretation. 

I am also working on a project that was inspired by le petit journal des refusées a wonderful piece of artwork printed on wall paper. I have some generous friends, who, when I told them that I needed some old wall paper, went through their stuff and gave me more than I could have hoped for. One of the pieces that I got from Elizabeth was from a Frank Lloyd Wright pattern, with his signature printed on the back. For whatever reason, this made me think of forgeries and handwriting analysis. The writer who created le petit, Frank Gelett Burgess (hmmm, another three-named Frank) also wrote a book called Vivette. In the the chapter entitled "At the Old Stand," Vivette offers a solution to a beggar's plight:
'Look at the advertising pages,' said Vivette; 'there's more fun there than in a county fair! Listen here – I'll present you with a capital of one dollar, that you are to invest as the 'Twocenter' bids you. Do you see the free samples that are to be had for the asking? Do you see the illustrated catalogues? Do you see the agency offers? Here's work to keep your mail-carrier running for a year! Now this is what you are to do: you're to answer every blessed one of those advertisements and you'll have amusement enough.'
And that is why there will be an old girdle ad in the print. Does this make sense to anyone but me?